Design a TATTOO for Recovery!

Most of the clients who come through my facility have tattoos and lots of them. It is a rare day for us to get through a group session without them talking animatedly about either a tattoo that they already have or one they are planning on getting.  Therefore, when the topic for group one night was one that would be difficult to stretch to cover all two hours, I thought, why not have everyone design their own recovery tattoo?

Having clients design a tattoo that signifies their recovery allows them to become open and creative in different ways, ways they may not be able to do with their words alone.  Another benefit of this activity is that it allows clients to take it as deep or keep it as superficial as they feel comfortable. Some clients will probably make a joke of their tattoo and make it funny, whereas others may use symbolism to highlight their struggle with addiction. Regardless of what they choose to do, it is important to remember that your opinion as a counselor is not important.  However they choose to participate in this activity is up to the client. There is nothing more counter productive to therapy than a counselor who judges the client based on what they share in group.

Respect their experience and respect their ideas.

JENGA in Group Therapy!

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Alright, so it has been a while since my last post! I guess that’s what happens when you try to maintain a blog and balance everything else! Since my last post, I have continued to run groups at my site and have continued to bring new activities to the sessions.  One activity that has been a big hit each time I have used it has been JENGA therapy!  Now, when JENGA comes out, be prepared for there to be excitement and then a very quick reeling in of that excitement when you explain that it is therapeutic JENGA, but after they start playing, they will be so absorbed in the game that they won’t mind to be doing therapy at the same time.

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Wondering how to make therapeutic JENGA? There are many ideas out there, but I have found the numbering system is the best.  Some people write specific questions on each piece and when the piece is pulled, the client answers that question.  I, however, have found that writing the question on the piece limits what I can use therapeutic JENGA with in group.  Therefore, I have numbered each piece 1-8.  Then, depending on the session, each number will relate to a predetermined question based on the topic at hand.

For example, when the group topic is triggers, questions may look something like this:

1. What are your internal triggers?

2. What are your external triggers?

3. In what ways do you cope with triggers? (Name one)

4. In what ways do you hope to work with triggers? (Name one)

5. What thought stopping techniques do you know of? (Name one)

6. Name two strengths that you have.

7. Name one social support that you have in recovery.

8. Freebie (no question!)

 

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When the inevitable happens and the tower falls down, be sure to have one MEGA JENGA question prepared for such an event.  Sometimes, I have had that one be that the one who dropped the tower needs to compliment each client in the room. Other times, they have had to say 3 positive things they have in their life at this moment.  Either way, be sure that the question is different and one that warrants being the end of game question.