Finding Nemo and Substance Abuse?

Preparing for group this week, the topic was humor in recovery and I was at a loss as to what to do. Humor is absolutely essential for recovery; we take ourselves so seriously in recovery and are always focused on the bad that sometimes you need an outlet to just let loose and have fun.  With that in mind, I was stuck because how do I teach having fun? After consultation with colleagues, the decision was made to show a comedic movie, with certain guidelines. No violence, language, sex or alcohol/drugs. Having quite the extensive comedy collection in my house I was excited to the best one, excited until I began to look at my movies. After going through two rows of movies I realized the one thing all of my comedies had in common – DRUGS.  What is it about comedies that it necessitates the inclusion of drugs into the plot in order to increase the comedic value? I’m trying to help teach my clients that they don’t need drugs or alcohol to have fun, and here was every comedy I could find enforcing the exact opposite.

Second guessing my idea that this was going to be easy, I looked over to the section I was previously ignoring, my embarrassingly extensive Disney collection.  Now, for me, I can think of no better Friday night than coming home from work, having a nice dinner and then cozying up on the couch with my husband and dog and watching a Disney movie – they’re hilarious and make me feel good afterwards, but how was I going to convince a room full of clients the same thing? Throwing caution to the wind, I decided to give it a shot putting my full faith in the universality of Disney (while bringing some snacks to group hoping it would encourage a more positive experience).  I ended up settling on Finding Nemo because it’s a personal favorite and of course, there’s an AA scene in the film (Fish are Friends, Not Food!) so how could it not relate to the group!

My only fear in presenting a pixar movie was that the clients would feel like I was treating them like children.  Hoping to assuage this thought,  I introduced the movie by talking about how we take ourselves too seriously in recovery.  I spoke about when children have a difficult problem, they engage in play which allows them to creatively look at the alternatives and open up a world they may not have thought of. In recovery, we can do the same and sometimes engaging in play in a safe environment may assist them overcome scenarios they otherwise would not be able to do.  Happily, I can say that within a minute of presenting the movie idea to the group, they had already set up their chairs to the television and happily sat back allowing the movie to do it’s job. The room was filled with laughter and for 100 minutes, the stress and troubles in their lives were put on hold for fun.

Now, while I encourage everyone to show a movie like this to their clients in recovery, do keep in mind that at least some psycho-education should come after the movie. Questions to ask could include, how did you feel watching the movie? Did you expect to feel that way?

Also, if there is time, spend a little bit of time discussing the benefits of laughter on the body.  If you do not know the ways in which laughter can help the body, go to this site here for some information: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity/topics/10-reasons-why-laughing-good-for-you.htm

Alright, that’s all I have on showing a film like this in recovery. Go out and give it a try!

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3 thoughts on “Finding Nemo and Substance Abuse?

  1. I teach substance abuse counseling for the Appalchain Judicial Circuit and I am LOVING reading your blogs and activities!!

  2. I’m totally doing this. But I don’t know if it would be okay to have older clients see this.

    • Hi Nina, I’m a little late on the response, but I just wanted to encourage the universality of his movie. Last time I used it, I had a group that ranged in age from 21 to 66 years old and it was actually the older clients who shared the most after the movie!

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