Affirmation Stones

Working with substance use groups, you usually are talking about heavy topics and it is difficult to have clients focus on the positive aspects of themselves as opposed to dwelling on the negative ones.  In order to combat that, I have found affirmation stones to be a good group activity.  In terms of supplies, everything you need is simple!

1) MAGAZINES – try to get a variety – especially if you have a heterogeneous group. I like to have some Men’s Fitness, Self, People, etc. Try to steer clear from Cosmo unless you want some unnecessary moments of them getting stuck on the sex section and before you know it, an hour has gone by and everyone’s still wanting to talk about the “just right” orgasm.

2) Scissors – get at least one for every two people

3) Tape or Super glue – I tend to stay away from the super glue after some unfortunate mistakes, but it does look nicer than tape.

4) Stones – if you are at a location like mine, you can just walk outside and have them pick their own! Make sure it’s dry and clear from dirt before starting or it will be a gross mess.

After you have all of the supplies, encourage people to look for words or pictures that make them feel good about themselves and that highlight the good they have within themselves. Make sure that if you suspect there are any literacy issues with group members, to offer the picture idea as well.

The rocks serve a purpose other than as a fun activity for a group. When clients start to feel overwhelmed and find themselves in a downward spiral looking only at the negative things they have done and internalizing that as being bad people, they can look at their rocks to remember the positive.

Have you tried affirmation stones with clients before? How was the experience?

Finding Nemo and Substance Abuse?

Preparing for group this week, the topic was humor in recovery and I was at a loss as to what to do. Humor is absolutely essential for recovery; we take ourselves so seriously in recovery and are always focused on the bad that sometimes you need an outlet to just let loose and have fun.  With that in mind, I was stuck because how do I teach having fun? After consultation with colleagues, the decision was made to show a comedic movie, with certain guidelines. No violence, language, sex or alcohol/drugs. Having quite the extensive comedy collection in my house I was excited to the best one, excited until I began to look at my movies. After going through two rows of movies I realized the one thing all of my comedies had in common – DRUGS.  What is it about comedies that it necessitates the inclusion of drugs into the plot in order to increase the comedic value? I’m trying to help teach my clients that they don’t need drugs or alcohol to have fun, and here was every comedy I could find enforcing the exact opposite.

Second guessing my idea that this was going to be easy, I looked over to the section I was previously ignoring, my embarrassingly extensive Disney collection.  Now, for me, I can think of no better Friday night than coming home from work, having a nice dinner and then cozying up on the couch with my husband and dog and watching a Disney movie – they’re hilarious and make me feel good afterwards, but how was I going to convince a room full of clients the same thing? Throwing caution to the wind, I decided to give it a shot putting my full faith in the universality of Disney (while bringing some snacks to group hoping it would encourage a more positive experience).  I ended up settling on Finding Nemo because it’s a personal favorite and of course, there’s an AA scene in the film (Fish are Friends, Not Food!) so how could it not relate to the group!

My only fear in presenting a pixar movie was that the clients would feel like I was treating them like children.  Hoping to assuage this thought,  I introduced the movie by talking about how we take ourselves too seriously in recovery.  I spoke about when children have a difficult problem, they engage in play which allows them to creatively look at the alternatives and open up a world they may not have thought of. In recovery, we can do the same and sometimes engaging in play in a safe environment may assist them overcome scenarios they otherwise would not be able to do.  Happily, I can say that within a minute of presenting the movie idea to the group, they had already set up their chairs to the television and happily sat back allowing the movie to do it’s job. The room was filled with laughter and for 100 minutes, the stress and troubles in their lives were put on hold for fun.

Now, while I encourage everyone to show a movie like this to their clients in recovery, do keep in mind that at least some psycho-education should come after the movie. Questions to ask could include, how did you feel watching the movie? Did you expect to feel that way?

Also, if there is time, spend a little bit of time discussing the benefits of laughter on the body.  If you do not know the ways in which laughter can help the body, go to this site here for some information: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity/topics/10-reasons-why-laughing-good-for-you.htm

Alright, that’s all I have on showing a film like this in recovery. Go out and give it a try!

The Ungame

ungame

While I was looking for fun and exciting games to bring to my group therapy sessions, I kept coming across the Ungame. So, after weeks of hemming and hawing, I decided to give it a chance and bought it through Amazon.  Most of clients are in their 20s/30s so I bought the Ungame for 20 Somethings, hoping it would be less “hokey” and “family fun” and more geared to this age group.

Overall, it was a nice addition to the group because it was a break from our usual conversation based session. Clients were at first excited to play a game, but the problem was that this game doesn’t really feel like a game, rather it feels like you’re just going through a list of questions.

A few suggestions for the game:

  • Use deck 1 if you are utilizing the Ungame for a break from “formal” therapy. The questions are lighter and keep the conversation flowing and the clients connecting with one another without feeling like they need to share some deep, dark secrets.
  • Go through the cards! Some of the cards will be of no benefit to your particular group of clients so take them out.  Nothing kills the momentum of the game faster than pulling a card that takes everyone out of the moment.
  • Great game for clients who do not know each other too well – so try to use it on a newer group, or a group that recently added some new members.  It allows them to open up in an environment without any pressure. It is far easier to share your favorite movie than it is to talk about a relationship you ruined because of your drug use.  However, after connecting with others about something as minor as a favorite movie, the clients are laying the ground work for more deep and serious conversation later on.
  • Make it more of a game! Every other turn, I allowed the clients to either answer their question or give the question to someone else – the only rule was once they passed the question to another person, that other person could not be asked another question that round. Clients love this aspect and it brings more of a “game element” to the activity.

So go out and give the Ungame a try! If you have used the Ungame before or have any ideas on how to better incorporate it into therapy, let me know!